Sep 27 2017, 4:00 PM EDT

Webinar: Using CalED Funds to Strengthen & Sustain Your Educator Workforce

The state budget passed by the California Legislature in June 2017 included strategic investments to address California’s growing teacher shortages, including approximately $9.4 million to create a competitive grant program, CalED. The program is designed to boost teacher recruitment and retention by focusing on the recruitment, preparation and continued learning of teachers and school leaders. CalED presents an opportunity for local educational agencies (LEAs) in California to strengthen and sustain their educator workforce.

This webinar was designed to inform LEAs (school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools) and partner organizations (institutions of higher education and nonprofits) about the latest research and promising practices in recruiting and retaining excellent educators, particularly in high-need fields and locations: What are evidence-based strategies for recruiting and retaining a strong educator workforce? How might LEAs and their partners develop proposals that are well grounded in research? 

During the webinar, researchers and practitioners shared findings from the latest research and discussed high-leverage, evidence-based investments in teacher and school leader recruitment, preparation, and retention. The recorded webinar and associated materials can serve as a resource to LEAs and their partners as they develop CalED proposals, which are due on October 27.

Presenters
Margaret Arthofer, Senior Director of Educational Services,
Association of California School Administrators
Karen DeMoss, Director, Sustainable Funding Project, Bank Street College
Kristina LaGue, Professor and Department Chair, California State University, Bakersfield
Kim McKenzie, Director of Administrator Services, Shasta County Office of Education
Anne Podolsky, Researcher and Policy Analyst, Learning Policy Institute
Brandon Ware, Coordinator of Curriculum, Bakersfield City School District
Moderated by Tara Kini, Director of State Policy, Learning Policy Institute